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Limberlost to host owl program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Curt Burnette, 260.368.7428, cburnette@indianamuseum.org

GENEVA, Ind. – The public is invited to an owl program on Sunday, March 26, from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Limberlost State Historic Site Visitor Center. The program, in collaboration with Upper Wabash Interpretive Services, will include a presentation on the “night shift” of raptors – owls.

“Being nocturnal, owls are not seen very often,” said Nicky Ball, Limberlost State Historic Site manager.  “This is a great opportunity to learn about these nighttime birds of prey.”

A live barred owl and screech owl are scheduled to appear during the presentation.

The program is free and open to the public. Donations are encouraged.

This program is sponsored by Valentine Feed and Supply of Portland, Ind.

For more information on this event, please contact Curt Burnette, site naturalist and program developer, at 260.368.7428 or cburnette@indianamuseum.org

About the barred owl
Barred owls are found in old forests, especially along rivers and in swamps. They are common in the eastern United States and, during the 20th century, they expanded north through central Canada into western Canada, then south into the Pacific Northwest and California. The “who cooks for you” is their famous call. They eat a wide variety of prey, including small mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates.

About the screech owl
Screech owls are found in forested areas east of the Rocky Mountains, including urban and suburban areas. Their call is a ghostly trill or whinny. They eat invertebrates, including worms, insects and crayfish. They also eat small mammals and birds, including some as large as jays and doves.

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Limberlost State Historic Site in Adams County and the Loblolly Marsh Wetland Preserve in Jay County are located near Geneva in northeastern Indiana. Part of the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites, Limberlost admission is free for Indiana State Museum & Historic Site members. General admission is $6 for adults, $5 for seniors and $3 for children. The Historic Site is located at 200 E. 6th Street in Geneva, Ind., just off U.S. Highway 27

Posted by Paige Southerland at 6:00 AM