Historic New Harmony

Historic New Harmony was the site of two early American utopian communities. The Harmonie Society, a group of German dissenters led by George Rapp, arrived in the United States in 1804, settling in Pennsylvania. 10 years later the Harmonists purchased 20,000 acres on the Wabash River, and moved to Indiana in 1814.

Visit Historic New Harmony 

Historic New Harmony 
Antheneum/Visitors Center
410 N. Arthur St.
New Harmony, IN 47631

P: 812.682.4474
    800.231.2168 (toll free)
E: harmony@usi.edu

Hours

  • The Atheneum/Visitor center is open year-round from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
    • Jan. 2 through March 14, 2017: Tours will be given on Saturdays at 1 p.m.
    • March 15, 2017: Daily tour resumes
    • Tours begin at the Atheneum/Visitors Center, located at the corner of North and Arthur Streets. The daily tour begins at 1 p.m.
    • Please note: New Harmony observes Central Daylight Savings Time.

2017 Holidays
Historic New Harmony is closed on New Years Day (Jan. 1), Easter (April 16), Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 23), Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) and Christmas Day (Dec. 25). 

Admission

Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites members receive FREE admission.

ADULT - $18
SENIOR* - $15
CHILD* - $5
CHILDREN UNDER 7 - FREE
FAMILY TICKET - $30
(members of the same household)
*Senior: Ages 60 and older, Child: Ages 3 through 17

Free street parking is available throughout the historic downtown area. There is also a free parking lot at the Atheneum/Visitors Center.

Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult. This policy complies with the University of Southern Indiana's Child Protection Policy.

School Groups

Interested in scheduling a group/school tour? Contact Historic New Harmony at 800.231.2168.

Events

Please view our calendar for upcoming events.

Facility Rentals

Consider hosting your special event at New Harmony State Historic Site.  Please fill out our inquiry form to receive information.

About Historic New Harmony

Historic New Harmony was the site of two early American utopian communities. The Harmonie Society, a group of German dissenters led by George Rapp, arrived in the United States in 1804 and settled in Pennsylvania. Ten years later, the Harmonists purchased 20,000 acres on the Wabash River and moved to Indiana in 1814.

The Harmonists believed that Christ's second coming was imminent. They pursued Christian perfection through every aspect of their daily conduct and created a highly ordered and productive community.

Between 1814 and 1824, the Harmonists constructed more than 180 log, frame and brick structures. The community was entirely self-sufficient and produced a wide variety of goods that were traded as far away as New Orleans, Pittsburgh and even overseas. 

In 1824, George Rapp decided to sell New Harmony. He found a buyer in Robert Owen, a wealthy industrialist from Scotland. In 1825, with his business partner William Maclure, Owen purchased New Harmony outright, hoping to establish a model community where education and social equality would flourish. Maclure, a well-respected amateur geologist, attracted many important scholars to new Harmony, including naturalists, geologists, educators and early feminists. 

Owen's "Community of Equality," had dissolved by 1827. Nevertheless, his Utopian dream brought significant contributions to American scientific and educational theory, study and practice. Early feminist activity increased national awareness of the women's suffrage issue. 

Today New Harmony is a vibrant community where festivals, concerts and plays are held throughout the year. The town is also a popular location for weddings, conferences and retreats. 

Historic New Harmony is a unified program of the University of Southern Indiana and the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites.

Exhibitions 

Harry Robinson: Comedian Extraordinaire

Now through January 2018

In the late 19th century, New Harmony was home to a well-respected troupe of professional actors and musicians. The nucleus of the theatrical company consisted of the Golden Family: Martin Sr. and his wife Bella, along with their 4 children (Martin Jr., William, Grace, and Frances). Their costumes, backdrops, and props were described as elaborate and elegant. These are the artifacts that make up the Golden Troupe Collection that is owned by the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites.

The Golden Troupe is a permanent exhibition in Thrall’s Opera House, which served as their home theatre. Each year, a different aspect of the Troupe is explored. This year’s display focuses on Harry Robinson, a native son of New Harmony who performed in the Golden Troupe and later on in silent movies.

The exhibit can be seen on Historic New Harmony’s guided walking tours. Tours take place at 1 p.m. daily from the Atheneum/Visitors Center. Information on the tour program and how to obtain tickets may be found at www.newharmony.org.

The exhibition was produced by the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites.

Harry A. Davis: A Life in Art

Now through January 2018

View artwork by Hoosier artist Harry Davis (1914-2006), one of the most award-winning artists in the history of the Hoosier Salon. He earned the distinction of winning the top award (Best of Show) a record 7 times.

For 37 years, he taught drawing and painting at Herron School of Art. One highlight of the exhibition is a painting Davis made from tent materials while he was stationed in Italy during World War II. Other noteworthy paintings in the show include two pieces that feature historic buildings in downtown Evansville.

The exhibit can be seen on Historic New Harmony’s guided walking tours. Tours take place at 1 p.m. daily from the Atheneum/Visitors Center. Information on the tour program and how to obtain tickets may be found at www.newharmony.org.

The exhibition was produced by the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites.