Limberlost

The Limberlost Swamp was the perfect laboratory for author Gene Stratton-Porter to study nature. At a time when most women were homemakers, Porter created a lasting legacy of northern Indiana’s vanishing natural history through her writings and photos.

Holidays at Limberlost
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, Nov. 27 to Dec. 30
Visit Gene Stratton-Porter’s Geneva home this holiday season to see her cabin decorated for the holidays. Enjoy the grounds, then see her home as it may have looked during the Christmas season when she lived there. See more holiday programs and other events below in the Events section.

Visit Limberlost State Historic Site

Address
202 E. 6th St.
Geneva, IN 46740

The Limberlost parking lot connects with U.S. Hwy 27, and is free to all visitors.

Contact Us
Phone:
260.368.7428
Fax: 260.368.7007
Email: limberlostshs@indianamuseum.org

Hours

Tuesday – Sunday
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Limberlost is closed Mondays, with the exception of Monday holidays, including Memorial Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, and Veterans Day. It is open Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and Presidents Day, but closed on Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve. 

Admission

Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites members receive FREE admission and a 10 percent discount in the gift shop.

Purchase admission tickets in the Limberlost Visitor Center. Tours are available on demand; the last tour begins at 4 p.m.
 

Purchase tickets

  • Adult - $7
  • Senior* - $6
  • Youth* - $3
  • Children Under 3 - Free
    *Senior: Ages 60 and older, Youth: Ages 3 through 17


Group Rate

For groups of 15 or more, adult tickets are $6, senior tickets are $5, and youthtickets are $2.

 

Events

We hope to see you at our upcoming events. Visit our calendar for a list of events happening at all 12 Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites locations.

Recent Blog Articles

 

School Groups

Field trip admission is free for pre-scheduled, accredited schools and homeschool groups of 10 or more K-12 students. Call 260.368.7428 to schedule your visit.

Academic topics covered include natural history, environmental science, multidisciplinary learning to combine art,
science and reading and writing from 1880s-1913.

Learn more about field trip and school program offerings in the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites PreK-12 Education Program Guide. View guide >>

Facility Rentals

 

Consider hosting your special event at Limberlost State Historic Site. Please fill out our inquiry form to receive information.

 

About Limberlost

In the early 1800s the Limberlost Swamp was described as a “treacherous swamp and quagmire, filled with every plant, animal and human danger known — in the worst of such locations in the central states.” Stretching for 13,000 acres the vast forest and swampland was legendary for its quicksand and unsavory characters. The swamp received its name from Limber Jim, who got lost while hunting in the swamp. When the news spread, the cry went out “Limber’s lost!”

To famed Indiana author Gene Stratton-Porter, the swamp was her playground, laboratory and inspiration for her acclaimed articles, fiction and photographs. Geneva (Gene) Grace Stratton was born in1863, near Wabash. Her parents passed along a love of the unspoiled outdoors — a love she kept throughout her life as a respected author, naturalist, photographer and illustrator. In 1886, Gene married Charles Porter, owner of a drug store in Geneva. After the birth of their daughter, Jeannette, they moved in 1888 to Geneva, near the Limberlost Swamp. Gene designed a 13-room, Queen Anne rustic log “cabin” completed in 1895. The interior is finished in both Victorian and Arts and Crafts styles. The Porters lived here until the swamp was drained in 1913. She then built a new home on the shore of Sylvan Lake near Rome City.

In the 18 years that she lived at Limberlost, she wrote six of her 12 novels and five of her seven nature books, including the best-selling Freckles and A Girl of the Limberlost. An estimated 50 million people worldwide have read her works, and many of her novels were produced as motion pictures.